Browse Exhibits (22 total)

Beyond Wisconsin

While the protests of the Wisconsin uprising were mainly in Madison surrounding the Capitol Building they had support from locations across the country.  There were those who traveled to Madison to protest, protests in other locations as well as food purchased to feed those at the Wisconsin Capitol Building.  The Wisconsin Uprising was not an isolated event.  The issues being discussed, the massive crowds, the major news coverage and the duration of the protests created a larger event which touched individuals beyond Wisconsin.

Coalitional Work in the Wisconsin Uprising

As I sifted through Sara T. Robert's photos from the Wisconsin Uprising, one thing struck me: the force of identity and coalitional work that was being performed by different groups together in opposition to the "Budget Repair" bill. It was not just one large and strong identity-formed group that protested, but rather many that formed an alliance of opposition. As political scientist Marie Hojnacki points out, when opponents are strong, organizations see greater benefits in joining a coalition with other groups. (1) Indeed, these protestors found themselves faced with a formidable opponent in Governor Scott Walker.

In fact, Hojnacki has hypothesized that the probability of an organization to join a cause is a function of context (if an issue provides an opportunity for broad agreement), allies (experience groups have with potential allies and their reputations), autonomy (retaining an identity in a group environment), and characteristics (the type of interests organizations represent). (2) It is due to an opportunity for agreement on policy (against union-busting), previous alliances, ability to maintain autonomy, and intersection of interests that enabled labor groups, higher education interest groups, and queer-identified groups to unite together in protest against the Budget Repair bill. These groups were selected as exemplars of coalition work in the 2011 Wisconsin Uprising because they represent the journey of Roberts as she came into contact with each of them and experienced their involvement first hand.

1. Hojnacki, Marie. "Interest Groups' Decisions to Join Alliances or Work Alone." American Journal of Political Science. 41. no. 1 (1997): 84.
2. Hojnacki, Marie: 66.

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Combating Tightened Security Measures

After the Walker Administration made indoor access to the Capitol limited, protestors and Assembly Democrats reclaimed use of the Capitol square. 

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Constituting a (Monolithic) Conservative Enemy

One of the important tasks of the Wisconsin protesters' rhetoric was constructing a combatable enemy.

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Feeding the Wisconsin Protests

This exhibit offers a glimpse of the food, people, and organizations that sustained the Wisconsin protesters. What emerges is a portrait of the way the shared experience of food can be a profound and simple means of connection.

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Fighting for Education

This exhibit highlights the central role education played in the Uprising. Teachers, students, and parents were highly mobilized, and led the charge against the Budget Repair Bill.

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Fractures

The pictures are of various protesters throughout the Wisconsin Uprising. Many of the scenes are of very different events, speakers, and subjects. Often the protests are conflicting.  Throughout this uprising many people came to protest divergent issues.

Humor in the Wisconsin Uprising

Someone brings a sign to the protest that simpley says, "OMG! It's Tina Fey!" Another protestor brandishes a poster that asks "Govenore Walker Y U No Resign???" The signs are funny, and memorable, but what function do they serve? This exhibit explores the role humor played in the Wisconsin Uprising protests.

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Losing "Home" in Wisconsin?

A look at the visual connection between the Wisconsin Uprising protests and homelessness.

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Music and Musicians at the Wisconsin Uprising Protests

This exhibit displays several photographs documenting the important role of music and musicians at the Wisconsin Uprising protests.

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